The Plus Size Problem: More Representation, More Options, More Acceptance

Written By: Mary Lucas 

The plus-size market has changed dramatically over the years, thanks in no small part to the work plus size women have done to create a demand for it. But, convincing plus size women they deserve nice things is a challenge. The fashion industry, men and media all tell you to ‘lose weight’ because that’s the only way you’re going to get quality clothing.

Women of color and individuals who identify as queer, lead the plus – size fashion movement, dedicated to fat acceptance and body positivity. Activists, bloggers, celebrities, and influencers, were given a platform to reach an unprecedented number of plus size consumers through social media.

A 2016 Refinery29 campaign  showed that “67 percent of U.S. women are plus sized, but only 2 percent of them are represented in the mainstream media.”

Everybody deserves to have the option to purchase high-end pieces that will last a lifetime, regardless of what size they happen to wear, even if they can’t afford it. The plus-size consumer should have access to the same options, rather than being limited to brands that dictate how they dress. When plus- size women are given a choice and the power to create their image, it is incredibly empowering.

Representation isn’t given — it’s earned. The fashion industry, diversity and all, is nowhere near solving its inclusion problem. But that doesn’t mean it hasn’t tried.

The plus-size market has changed dramatically over the years, thanks in no small part to the work plus size women have done to create a demand for it. But, convincing plus size women they deserve nice things is a challenge. The fashion industry, men and media all tell you to ‘lose weight’ because that’s the only way you’re going to get quality clothing.

Women of color and individuals who identify as queer, lead the plus – size fashion movement, dedicated to fat acceptance and body positivity. Activists, bloggers, celebrities, and influencers, were given a platform to reach an unprecedented number of plus size consumers through social media.

A 2016 Refinery29 campaign  showed that “67 percent of U.S. women are plus sized, but only 2 percent of them are represented in the mainstream media.”

Everybody deserves to have the option to purchase high-end pieces that will last a lifetime, regardless of what size they happen to wear, even if they can’t afford it. The plus-size consumer should have access to the same options, rather than being limited to brands that dictate how they dress. When plus- size women are given a choice and the power to create their image, it is incredibly empowering.

Representation isn’t given — it’s earned. The fashion industry, diversity and all, is nowhere near solving its inclusion problem. But that doesn’t mean it hasn’t tried.

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